* Author Topic: PR Research Thread - NO CHIT CHAT!!!!!  (Read 64258 times)

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Offline Betty-Boo

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    Offline Momito

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    Re: PR Research Thread - NO CHIT CHAT!!!!!
    « Reply #41 on: 1/04/12, 15:29 »
    On the same subject of new stem cells research, take a look at www.ovascience.com where there is an article on the stem cell research they have been doing.

    There was also an interesting article written on the subject in The Economist in March 3rd 2012 edition, entitled Human Reproduction, Life begins at 45.  What is not clear is when or if this breakthrough will become comercially available.


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    Offline TryMeditate

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    Re: PR Research Thread - NO CHIT CHAT!!!!!
    « Reply #42 on: 10/04/12, 12:53 »
     
    Researchers from Edinburgh university are now working on this with Harvard.  Edinburgh have approached the HFEA with a view to applying for the right to fertilise one of these eggs grown from ovarian stem cells.   
     
    http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/scientists-rewrite-rules-of-human-reproduction-7624708.html
     
    Dr Telfer. ”I think personally [fertilising the first eggs] is do-able. I see no hurdles why it cannot be done this year,“ .


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    Offline TryMeditate

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    Re: PR Research Thread - NO CHIT CHAT!!!!!
    « Reply #43 on: 18/06/13, 17:06 »
    Kisspeptin

    The first woman to have IVF treatment using a pioneering new method developed at Imperial College London has given birth to a baby boy.

    The new technique uses the natural hormone kisspeptin to stimulate egg development instead of the usual fertility drugs. Doctors hope using kisspeptin will give mothers a lower risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), a potentially life-threatening condition that can be triggered by IVF drugs used now.

    http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/newsandeventspggrp/imperialcollege/newssummary/news_18-6-2013-16-42-49


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    Offline TryMeditate

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    Re: PR Research Thread - NO CHIT CHAT!!!!!
    « Reply #44 on: 18/06/13, 17:10 »
    kisspeptin hormone effectively induces egg maturation during infertility treatment, shows study
    Posted in: Medical Science News | Medical Research News | Women's Health News

    Published on June 18, 2013 at 5:30 AM

    The naturally occurring hormone kisspeptin effectively induces egg maturation during infertility treatment, according to a clinical in vitro fertilization (IVF) study. The results were presented Monday at The Endocrine Society's 95th Annual Meeting in San Francisco.

    Aptly named after the popular chocolate Hershey's kiss candy, kisspeptin was discovered in Hershey, PA, in 1996. Released by the brain in both males and females, the hormone triggers the development of secondary sexual characteristics and other changes of puberty.

    Each year, thousands of women seek IVF treatment for infertility. The treatment is readily available and often successful, but, like all medical interventions, still has some risks. One of the most serious is a condition called ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. This condition results when the hormones used to stimulate egg maturation overstimulate the ovaries, which can then become painfully swollen. Often cases are mild and improve without treatment in one to two weeks. However, approximately 10 percent of cases are severe ones causing life-threatening complications, including shortness of breath, blood clots and kidney failure.

    In contrast, kisspeptin stimulates the ovaries to release levels of reproductive hormones that are similar to those produced naturally by women with normal menstrual cycles. Because of this, fertility researchers are interested in the hormone's potential to safely induce egg maturation in IVF.

    Results from this study funded by the Medical Research Council UK and the National Institute for Health Research indicate that the hormone kisspeptin effectively induces egg maturation when used during IVF treatment. In 21 of 22 women who participated in the study, egg maturation occurred after kisspeptin injections. Embryos developed in 20 women. Twelve hours after kisspeptin injections, luteinizing hormone levels increased eightfold. During the normal reproductive cycle, luteinizing hormone increases to trigger ovulation.

    "We have shown that kisspeptin can be used effectively in patients undergoing IVF treatment to more naturally stimulate the release of reproductive hormones and result in a healthy baby," said study lead author Waljit Dhillo, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Endocrinology at Imperial College London, United Kingdom. "The use of a hormone that stimulates the release of reproductive hormones during IVF treatment as occurs in normal women could prevent ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Kisspeptin may, therefore, offer an entirely novel therapeutic option for fertility treatment."

    Study participants included 22 women who received IVF treatment with kisspeptin in place of the customary hormone, human chorionic gonadotropin, used to induce egg maturation during IVF. Thirty-six hours after kisspeptin injection, investigators obtained the mature eggs, which they then artificially inseminated. After embryo development occurred, investigators transferred one to two embryos to the uterus.

    Offline theodora

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    Get up & move after your donor egg transfer!
    « Reply #45 on: 19/06/13, 09:03 »
    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0015028213006092

    Bed rest after embryo transfer negatively affects in vitro fertilization: a randomized controlled clinical trial
    Sharayu Gaikwad, M.D., Nicolas Garrido, Ph.D., Ana Cobo, Ph.D., Antonio Pellicer, M.D., José Remohi, M.D. (Valencia, Spain)

    Conclusion: "The statistically significant higher liveborn infant rate shown in our no-rest group confirms that 10 minutes of bed rest immediately after ET has no positive effect and in fact can be negative for the outcome of IVF with oocyte donation."

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    Offline TryMeditate

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    PR Research Thread - NO CHIT CHAT!!!!!
    « Reply #46 on: 21/11/13, 14:40 »
    IVA - In vitro Activation

    Groundbreaking! Women suffering from premature ovarian failure, or very low ovarian reserve, low AMH, gives birth to a baby. Another woman pregnant.

    http://med.stanford.edu/ism/2013/september/infertility.html

    http://news.sky.com/story/1148637/baby-breakthrough-infertile-woman-gives-birth



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    Offline TryMeditate

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    PR Research Thread - NO CHIT CHAT!!!!!
    « Reply #47 on: 4/04/14, 10:51 »
    Interesting link to an article on a blog about "some" women with autoimmune POF resuming ovulation when the autoimmune conditions were suppressed… via steroids in this case, tx of Addisons disease in another. 


    http://www.inviafertility.com/blog/egg-donation/drvkarande/premature-ovarian-failure-fertility-treatment-what-works-and-what-does-not


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    Offline TryMeditate

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    PR Research Thread - NO CHIT CHAT!!!!!
    « Reply #48 on: 4/04/14, 11:04 »
    Article from a Chicago clinic titled:  Women with low AMH can get pregnant.

    I like some of the blogs I've read on this clinic's website. 

    http://www.inviafertility.com/blog/infertility/draniruddhamalpani/overtreating-patients-with-low-amh-level


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    Offline klik

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    Day 3 vs. Day 5 transfers
    « Reply #49 on: 24/03/16, 08:33 »
    Research suggests that for poor-prognosis patients (so, us, on this forum!), day 3 transfers are recommended over day 5:

    As two meta-analyses in the COCHRANE library demonstrate (Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2007;17:CD002118 and 2012;7:CD002118), if one looks at the cumulative pregnancy rate achieved from a single IVF cycle follicle/oocyte cohort, cleavage-stage embryo transfer will always achieve significantly more clinical pregnancies and live births than blastocyst-stage embryos in all patient populations. The reason is simple: Some embryos, which do not survive longer embryo culture to blastocyst-stage, if transferred on day-3, will still result in completely normal live births. Extended embryo culture to blastocyst stage, therefore, results in loss of embryos with normal pregnancy potential.

    Patients who are most negatively affected by blastocyst-stage embryo transfers are women with relatively few embryos (i.e., poor-prognosis patients like older women or women with low functional ovarian reserve at younger ages) because they may end up with simply no transferable embryos. Good-prognosis patients, who usually produce larger numbers of embryos, even after losing some, will still have enough for transfer and, indeed, may have selected out their “best” embryos by culturing to blastocyst stage. The two meta-analyses, therefore, suggest that they marginally improve their immediate IVF outcomes.


    from:

    https://www.centerforhumanreprod.com/fertility/is-there-really-a-value-in-embryo-selection/

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