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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
just wondering whether other people experience this or is it just me ::)

so often when i change DD's bum when out and about people say 'oh your sooo good using cloth nappies'  and i just cant fathom out what to say back :-\ it irritates me everytime..if they think i'm so good, then why dont they themselves be 'good' too and get on with cloth, because in reality what they are saying is that if i'm 'good ' then they 'arent good'..so why dont they do something about it!!!! ^bigbad^ and the very least they could do is use an eco-disposable but no there they are with their pampers and huggies :mad:

yesterday i wasnt in a very patient sort of a mood and snapped at a friend..'well why dont you try them instead of keep telling me how good i am, because really what your saying is that you're completely crap and filling up landfill with your nappies' i sort of regret being so harsh but i'm kind of glad i said something because the room went silent for a moment while everyone digested it ;D
later some bod came up with the old classic 'well if you're washing at 60 degrees i dont see how that can be any more eco -friendly' Now I'm not 100% sure of the exact facts and figures (help Claire!) i just KNOW I'm doing the right thing from the numerous things i've read, but i could do with a good reply to this one too.

theres also a certain generation who just look aghast at the notion 'WHY :eek:  are you using cloth??' the notion of going back to the 'old days' when theres an easy alternative now completely baffles them ::) my usual answer is 'because i dont poo in my dustbin so dont see why childrens poo should end up in a dustbin' ;D

anybody else have these sorts of conversations with people..and what is are constructive and helpful replies ???

kj x

 

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Hi KJ,

Sorry, I just had to reply as your comment about pooing in the bin is classic  ^roflmao^ Love it  ;) So so true!

I'm afraid i'm in the camp of saying yes you are very good and happily admit i'm bad but I really do not have the time or the inclination to use washable wipes (although do for cleaning hands and faces) or reusable nappies. I'm pretty good with everything else but for me that was just one step too far (although I do chuck as much poo in nappies down the loo before putting them in the bin if that counts  ;D)

I'm not sure of all the facts and figures these days but when pg with ds1 I looked into it briefly and the arguments were pretty much 50/50 at the time so I didn't look much further. I am sure Claire will have some good stats for you  ;)

I think the poo/bin comment will shut people up everytime (or make them wet themselves laughing  ;D)

S xxx
 

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I know what you mean, I get allsorts of comments,

my HV loves the fact I'm using real nappies and last time I went for jabs she went out of her way to show the new HV the wonders of new nappies, I just grinned! ;D

As for 'WHY are you using cloth!?!?!'... for me they are cheaper in the long run, fill less dustbin/landfil but most of all (and the answer I usually give) is they 'work better than disposables, fit better and almost never leak!!!'

Yes washing at 60 isn't as good as washing at 30, but its MUCH better than the traditional washing at 90! I use less powder than suggested and line dry, so am much better than those that use too much powder and a tumble dryer!!! ;D And the sun bleaches all the stains out so I don't even need a whitener most of the time!!!

We are doing the right thing, nothing is perfect, but we're doing better than filling the earth with non degrading plastic nappies!

xx

^hugme^ ^hugme^
 

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KJ don't get mad, get converting!! ;)

I have to say I don't get that upset about the comments, most people I know are quite interested, particularly when they see that it's not the big faff they think it is to change a reusable nappy. So I like to use it as a chance to change their minds
I guess I might be used to turning around negative or complacent opinions about environment stuff because it was my job - and may be again if my brain ever starts working again! my friends are not a patch on some of the company Directors I had to deal with :eek:

Hey, use some of this - we had this debate on our ecoparenting thread before ;)

ceedubya said:
A few things to mention from other posts:

Clare (mack) you said you weren't sure about the environmental effects of an extra wash if you use reusable nappies. Well sure there is an additional impact but with most environmental decisions there are tradeoffs and you have to decide what's best on balance.
In the case of nappies I have always felt that the water and energy impacts are relatively low with modern washing machines, so long as you don't do frivolous washes of one or two items, and so long as you use some kind of biodegradable detergent then the polluting effects on the water are also lower.
In comparison, the biggest effect of disposables is on waste, which in the UK and especially anywhere around the South East of England and large cities, is a massive problem. Not only is landfill running out but any extra energy you use with a few extra washes is probably far outweighed by the energy used to collect your waste (as in trucks!!) and the more volume, the more this takes. As landfill runs out waste is trucked further and further distances. then not to mention the adverse effects in terms of emissions from rotting waste, the fact that nappies take a long time to breakdown. Also what many people forget is the energy and raw material use to make disposable nappies in the first place. With a washable nappy once it's made, it's made for life so although even this manufacturing process will have some energy and possibly chemical effects, they will last a lifetime so the effect per nappy use is minimal.

Much was made by the media about a 'report' a couple of years back which implied that there was no difference between reusables and disposables. The report was written by the Environment Agency, and it was their first attempt at doing this type of balancing debate (it's called life cycle analysis) and the media got hold of it and made it out to be a much bigger deal than it was. TBH it wasn't a very good first attempt at this kind of study as they hadn't applied any weighting to different environmental effects. To make a balanced decision, you have to decide which impacts are the most important in any given situation, this report made them all equal. To me the effects on water are much more manageable than waste and raw material use so I choose to manage the waste impacts of nappies rather than water.
Sorry if I got carried away, it's what I did for a living til I had Matthew! :eek:
Councils would not hand over as much as £50 for using reusables if they were not very keen to reduce the waste burden that much!
The company I used to work for had a massive waste load, the equivalent of that of a local authority, and the landfill tax increases we were facing were worth £millions to us over the next few years - I would imagine it would be the same to your local authority. At the end of the day reducing your waste will reduce your council tax bill because the costs of that waste are passed directly on to residents. Try that one!

Claire x
 

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Why not try "well i couldn't bare the thought that if we used disposables they'd still be polluting the planet long after we are both dead"
or "did you know that if henry viii had used disposables on queen elizabeth we could have them in museums looking much the same as they were after they came off her bum"
Lizi.x
 

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Dear KJ

I'm a volunteer with a real nappy group and our answers to these kind of questions are:

1.  it's better for the environment - reduced landfill and the impacts of washing are less than the impacts of manufacturing and disposing of disposables.  We looked at the Environment Agency report on reusables v disposables and felt it contained various false assumptions re reusables (including assuming that people always used nappysan or bleach, washed at 90 degrees, tumble dried and ironed their reusables!). And, as mentioned below, do we really want to leave disposables lying around for the next few hundred years?
2.  it's better for your purse - depending on the type of reusable you choose and the brand of disposable you might have used instead, you could save up to £500 on nappies for your first child, and even more if you use the same reusables for a second child, sell them second hand, or pass them on to someone else to use.
3.  they might be better for your baby.  There has been some research which suggests that the chemical gels and plastics used in disposables could be harmful, especially to baby boys, although there is no definitive view on this yet.
4.  they are much nicer/softer on babies' bottoms than disposables, don't smell as much when dirty as disposables (because of the latter's chemical gels) - and they look much cuter as well!!!

Ellie





 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
sorry i never came back to this till now..i've been erm ..busy ;D

thanks for all the replies..great info to keep ready for my next unsuspecting offender lol

claire..i do try to make it an opportunity to sell the virtues of reusables as often as i can, i just have grumpy days where i just feel like i'm banging my head on a brick wall with all the efforts i make to be eco/earth-friendly..whereas others dont give a toss...i look out of the window and see my neighbours large bin overflowing whereas we get by with a small wheely bin which is never full.... i go to my friends house and her tumble driers on full blast when its a boiling hot sunny day..blah blah sigh ::)

kj x
 
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