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New home greenies....
 

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Hi evryone
Spring is here in the N.W and i've been outside all day
I was gutted to find all my gladioli bulbs from last year had gone mouldy 120 in total!
I've just sorted out my pots and hanging baskets with new compost and fertilizer and those squidgy gel crystals
and trimmed my old geraniums which survived last winter in the greenhouse. I've planted loads of seedlings as well so far only the marigolds are showing any signs of life.
Even dh has had a go and cut the lawn and trimmed the edges  ::)
And finally my clematis have come back to life and i've killed my first snail  :mad:and declared war on the slugs  ^furios^. I've cut an old plant pot in half so theres no bottom and put copper tape around it and then put it around my fox gloves and lupins - with a barrier of eco friendly slug pellets - i'll let you know if it works
Emma - i have a passion flower and no there's no sign of life yet
anyway bye for now
CaseyX
 

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Need your help greenies..
I saw a tree in London last week and another one like it today at a park.
I'm sure ive seen them as bushes, they're like trees with blossom, which has pink,white petals, that looks like they're growing upwards. Any ideas? Have got some garden books and cant find it.
They're a similar colour to some of the star gazer lillies, pink/white but unusual that petals are quite tight (look like lilles when opening) and grow upwards.
Any advice as to what this is?
Thanks
Ju
 

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Could they be magnolia? 
 

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sounds like magnolia to me - quite small with white or pinky white petals pointing upwards?
 

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Sicknote - I think it is magnolia too. I love them, but my garden is too small for one!

Thanks for the advice about my passionflower. Sounds like they are just late starters!

I have another question. Why have all the leaves fallen off my fig? It was in a small pot, but had outgrown it. I repotted it a few days ago and gave it a nitrogen feed. Today all the leaves had fallen off.

Emma, xx

 

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Hi greenies,

Sicknote - its probably a Magnolia soulangeana - they grow quite big eventually (also known as Magnolia lilliflora - so good description!). Have you seen Magnolia stellata? Its smaller with pure white flowers like little ripped hankies. If you're thinking of growing one you'll need acid soil or you could grow them in a big pot full of ericaceous compost.

Well took full advantage of the weekend weather and finished my front garden. It looks great - all grasses (miscanthus, stipa, and carex) with red hot pokers and helenium. Covered the soil with bark which sets the grasses off a treat. Keep having to go the window now to check its still there! Can't wait for late summer to see it in its full glory.

The allotments full of potatoes, onions and parsnips so I actually feel that I'm ahead of the game for once. Cant last!

Hope you had a good weekend too.

TTFN
 

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HI all im not very green fingered in fact my back garden as no plants in this is not due to the fact i dont like them but i have a phobia of WORMS ergh but thought i would turn to you as my back garden is infested with red ants any ideas to get rid as ant powder aint working thank you

Kerry xx
 

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Thanks girls wil look it up in net and see if i can get a piccy and see if thats it.
 

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Hi -we have 2 small magnolias in the garden -one is Leonard Messel not sure bout the other but are lovely shades of pink and fine for smallish gardens -

    sarah x ;)
 

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Hmm have been looking on inet and cant seem to see what i want? Have seen pics of magnolias and they look the right colour but still not quite right. Will keep looking, if all else fails i am off for a test at my clinic next week, near where i saw the tree, i'll take a piccie and may have to post it for you all to inspect.
Might go to the garden centre and have a looky through some books.
Ju x

The tree is on Marylebone road, just along from regents park station across from regents park, by the statue. Is anyone from around there who may know where i mean. It's frustrating me now..
 

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Hello,

Kerry  - I killed my red ants by pouring upteen kettles of boiling water on them!

Cathy - your garden sounds lovely! I'm really keen on grasses too, especially Miscanthus and Sinensis. I can only have them in my front garden, where my dogs don't go, as dog pee seems to kill them almost instantly!

I've gone mad with broad beans at my allotment this year

Emma, xx
 

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Thanks for your reply emma may just try that someone mentioned that lemon will help any one know if this is right apparantly they cant stand the stuff

Kerry xxx
 

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Good to get back to this message board,

I completed my first paper on Soil Structure and Analysis for my Correspondence Course today and feel very pleased with myself.  First time I have written an essay since leaving college 10 years ago!  Makes a change to write about something useful!

Planted my peas, lettuces, carrots, tomatoes and tomatillos this weekend just gone, maybe a little late, but struggling with feeling poorly so have been waiting for a sunny day to meet up with a healthy feeling day!  Here's hoping everything will come up fine  :)

I'm sorry I missed the bit when you were mentioning Hugh F-W and River Cottage earlier.  I am completely obssessed with the whole series and concept (also The Good Life)!  We went on one of Hugh FW's courses and met the man and he cooked for us.  The whole evening was sooo inspiring.  I even got a photo of me and Hugh sitting together on a hay bale! Me and DH are intending on moving down to West Dorset or Devon in the next couple  of years and starting up a smallholding.  Seems to me the perfect way of life - happy dreaming!

Small question, I sowed all my seeds for my annuals and everything is coming up fine, including my Salpiglossis (my favourite Cathy!) but my Impatiens haven't come up at all!!  I sowed three different varieties, but not one seedling has raised its head!  Any ideas why not?  I used seed compost and kept them in the greenhouse etc. like all the other seeds....  ???

Good to see so many greenies, such a therapeutic hobby!!

Love Fone xx  ^daisy^
 

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Hi Fone,

What course are you doing? Might need to do my RHS Diploma by correspondance but I don't think I'll learn too well that way. Need someone to keep banging on at me!!

Impatiens are notoriously difficult to germinate (Sorry!) They need very warm temps to get them going. I've only had success if I've put them in the airing cupboard til I've seen sighns of life. They also hate being too wet. Its the one thing I always buy as plugs cos i find they're more trouble that they're worth.

Do you like Salpiglossis cos its such a silly name?! Fave thing at the mo are my little Minnow daffs. I'll have a new fave next week!

My tomatoes went in at the weekend. I find they get leggy if I do them too early (plus the greenhouse isn't built yet so no permenant home for them yet!) Also sowed some Tagetes at the same time to plant in the tommy grow bags and keep off the whitefly.

TTFN
 

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Have been picking up so much by monitoring this thread. Am posting my tree picture on wednesday for you al to identify for me. I have just started to redesign my back garden and will be keeping my eye out for any suggestios and plants that you all liker.
Ju x
 

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Hi Cathy,
The course I am doing is called Organic Gardening and it focuses on mainly all types of fruit, veg and salad. It also covers soil, composting, herbs, pests, diseases, history, and lots of other bits too. It is through The Horticultural Correspondence College, I think they do the RHS stuff too. The course I am on is certified by the Soil Association. But I am only really doing it for my own interest and knowledge. I am not planning a career around it, so wasn't worried about it not being RHS. It is very well organised and they have a website http://www.hccollege.co.uk/OG1.htm is my course details but if you just go to www.hccollege.co.uk you can see everything else they cover!

Thanks for the advice on the impatiens, I'll just go back to our local nursery and get some plug plants and not fret over the seeds!!

Love Fone xx ^daisy^
 

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Hello again

So pleased the weather's getting nicer so I can get out and about in the garden.   ^sunny^

A couple of simple questions for you experts:
Daffodils - dead head or not?  I have to say, I've not had the best of success in getting my bulbs to flower, I have tried planting them deeper, but still not much better.  I tend to dead head those that do flower, does it acutally do any good?  Also, do you cut the leaves back or just leave to wilt?

Thanks

Claire
x
 

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Hi Claire

  re your question -personally I dead head the flowers and leave the leaves to die back and mine do pretty well
(am keen but not an expert !)
as for weather fab now Im back at work but garden looks lovely with cherry trees/camelias and pieris and tubs of scarlet tulips/blue scilla look lovely
Sicknote -looking forward to seeing your picture as I want to know what the tree is now... :-\
        sarah x
 

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Hi Claire,

Definitely dead head the daffodils: if you leave the dead flowers on, the plant will put all its energy into making seeds and you want it to put the energy back into the bulb for next year instead. In the same way, you should leave the leaves alone to die back, never chop them off or even tie them. While they are on the plant they will make food for the plant, which will be stored in the bulb till next year.

As far as flowering goes, often bulbs won't do it if they are at the wrong depth. The general rule of thumb is to plant them at 3 times the depth of the bulb, the depth being the length of the dry bulb from root area to the "nose" where the shoots appear. So effectively you should dig a hole that is 4 times that depth, then there will be 3 times that depth on top of the bulb. I think I have made that sound more complicated than it is!!!  :-[

I always put a handful of grit in the planting hole to sit the bulb on. This keeps the base plate of the bulb out of the wet, if your soil is poorly drained like mine is!

Jo x

 
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