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Hi there everyone,

A couple of weeks ago I donated eggs to my cousin. They got 14 eggs, of which 13 fertilised. They implanted one after three days and there are another five in the freezer. We just found out that she's not pregnant after the two week wait. I'm really sad that this first attempt didn't work but she has another few chances at it so I'm crossing my fingers that the next time there's a positive result.

As a result of the donation I got mild OHSS - I drank a lot of water, ate a lot of salty foods and the clinic put me on some drugs, so it went away after about four-five fairly miserable days. I'm only 28 and, while I don't want children at the moment, I'm sure I'll want them at some point in future. And having seen the size my ovaries ballooned to on the scans I just can't stop thinking that I must have damaged them in some way.

There just doesn't seem to be any reliable information about there about the health implications of egg donations. Pre-donation the clinic told me that there are no long term risks (i.e. beyond OHSS and possible infection from the extraction), and the counselling focussed solely on the psychological impacts of known donation. But the internet is full of possible links to ovarian cancer and infertility, and it's very difficult to work out what sources of information to trust. It worries me that egg donors don't seem to be followed up at all - I got a very bemused look from the clinic when I suggested that they make sure my medical records from the clinic were sent to my GP in case they were relevant in future.

I'm not quite sure why I'm posting on this board to be honest. Maybe someone out there is the source of all knowledge on the health implications of egg donation and can reassure me?

Donorgirl x
 

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Hi donorgirl,

Didn't want to read and run, so, although I'm afraid I have nothing I can give you in the way of advice, I just wanted to say what a wonderful thing you are doing for your cousin. As someone currently going through IVF myself with the help of an (anonymous) donor, I have found myself thinking a lot about the donor. In my case the donor has her own reasons for donating eggs as she is going through IVF herself (so sharing her eggs), but what you are doing is incredibly brave and kind.

I'm sure there are others who will be able to offer you the advice you are looking for, but if not, why not try posting on the 'Ask a midwife/nurse' boards to see if they can help?

Hope you get the reassurance you need and deserve and that your cousin gets her BFP soon.

Jules x
 

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Donorgirl: Found a few articles for you

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v442/n7103/full/442607a.html

"Louise Brinton at the US National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, and her colleagues tried to control for these factors in one of the most comprehensive studies so far. They collected the medical records of more than 12,000 women who received ovulation-stimulating drugs between 1965 and 1988. The team did not find statistically significant increases in breast and ovarian cancer, but did find that the women were around 1.8 times more likely to develop uterine cancer (M. D. Althuis et al. Am. J. Epidemiol. 161, 607-615; 2005).

Such studies have reassured many specialists that the risks of ovulation stimulation are insignificant. But Brinton and others studying the issue say the picture is still incomplete. Brinton's study involved mainly women who took clomiphene citrate, rather than the gonadotropin hormones introduced for IVF in the 1980s. Researchers have only had a decade or so to study significant numbers of women taking the newer drugs, but extra cancers may not appear until the women reach 50 or 60."

http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayFulltext?type=1&fid=240402&jid=RMR&volumeId=11&issueId=01&aid=240401
 

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Hi

I don't know much about egg donating but have been through the massive ovary situ so wanted to post,

You have done an amazing thing and it must be such a complex mix of emotions, I agree it must be scary having had a complication but I don't think the clinics would let people do it if there was a known risk, they couldn't-

I had IVF last year and my ovaries also got extremely swollen (grapefruits, apparently) although I avoided OHSS- it is worrying but I just had a scan to check everything for going again on a frozen cycle and the doc said my ovaries were looking very healthy, ( it was a v swish 3d scanner) so I think they can go down fine and still be good,

I'm also scared about increased risks of things like cancer but I rationalise to myself that at the same time there are so many factors in life that slightly increase/ decrease chances of getting all sorts of things and when you read a raised risk it is actually a raised percentage of a small percentage- basically figures can be v confusing,

I'm not sure if this is at all helpful and I totally agree with you about feeling let down about lack of follow up,

also wanted to add that if Karma plays a role in the hands we are dealt you have a big dose of good things coming your way after making such an amazing donation,

I really hope those frosties work for your cousin and I also hope you find answers that make you feel happier,  ^reiki^ ^hugme^

Livity K x

 

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Hi,

I'm new on here and I just wanted to add that I am due to start ED for my sister this month, I haven't been able to find too much information, and would love to hear about your experience, as although I am totally committed to this, its still very scary!

K
 
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Hi - what amazing women you are to give such a fantastic gift.... ^hugme^ ^hugme^ ^hugme^...can I just say though that OHSS can be easily avoided in many cases if your clinic has assessed your issues thoroughly, uses the right protocol, is monitoring you properly during the tx (with regular scans and bloods from day 4/5) - the best clinics will do this routinely...

xxx
 

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Agree with others what a wonderful thing to do.
If you have or at risk of OHSS then the clinic will monitor you. They will know how you respond to the medication and will tell you to reduce the amount you inject over the days. Do not worry. When they syringe the folicles out of your ovaries they normally fill with water and that is why they may swell. What you need to do is drink plenty of water and eat well and rest.
 
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