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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi

Thanks for providing such caring support.

I saw an article on the BBC website re. a survey conducted earlier this year by the US National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (with a quote from the HFEA) saying that patients (even in their late thirties) should not rush into IVF because fewer than 1 in 10 (in their late thirties) would fail to get pregnant after 2 years if their hubby was under 40 and that couples should be more patient before moving to assisted conception if there are no major problems.

The dilemma is when to move ahead to IVF - I am just 38 and have been trying for about 15 months (with an early miscarriage in that period), normal FSH levels (5.2) etc, endio biopsy, patents tubes ( slight distention on one side thou' the consultant was unsure if this would have an impact because both tubes were patent) and normal sperm count. Do you think 2 years is too long to wait or is this realistic if there are no obvious problems?

My consultant says that we can have either superovulation with IUI or IVF but I am not sure which is most effective for my age range please?

Also, my husband is 50 and the consultant said his sperm test was excellent, but is there somthing else that he has not been tested for that effects men over 40 (as mentioned in this survey), if so what tests should we be having please that would pick up on age related problems for men?


Many thanks

Anne

 

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Dear Anne,

I tend to agree that there is rather a rush nowadays to get into more and more invasive technology to get a 'quick fix'. It is important to let nature take its' course within reason but of course it is equally important not to wait too long in terms of potential complications later in life such as Downs' syndrome and menopause. It is good general advice that all couples should have been trying for at least two years before any intervention but each case must be taken on its' merits.

I would recommend a few cycles of IUI initially and see how that goes. Your history sounds pretty normal so this could well be successful.

It might be worth considering chromosomal analysis on both of you (bearing in mind the miscarriage). This is an easy blood test which your clinic should be able to organise.

Otherwise keep trying and good luck!!

Peter

anne1 said:
Hi

Thanks for providing such caring support.

I saw an article on the BBC website re. a survey conducted earlier this year by the US National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (with a quote from the HFEA) saying that patients (even in their late thirties) should not rush into IVF because fewer than 1 in 10 (in their late thirties) would fail to get pregnant after 2 years if their hubby was under 40 and that couples should be more patient before moving to assisted conception if there are no major problems.

The dilemma is when to move ahead to IVF - I am just 38 and have been trying for about 15 months (with an early miscarriage in that period), normal FSH levels (5.2) etc, endio biopsy, patents tubes ( slight distention on one side thou' the consultant was unsure if this would have an impact because both tubes were patent) and normal sperm count. Do you think 2 years is too long to wait or is this realistic if there are no obvious problems?

My consultant says that we can have either superovulation with IUI or IVF but I am not sure which is most effective for my age range please?

Also, my husband is 50 and the consultant said his sperm test was excellent, but is there somthing else that he has not been tested for that effects men over 40 (as mentioned in this survey), if so what tests should we be having please that would pick up on age related problems for men?

Many thanks

Anne
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Peter


Many thanks. Please may I ask what a chromosonal analysis is and what does it look for - my partner has two children from a previous relationship, so would any problems with chromosones have already shown up or can they develop with age?

Also, should I ask the consultant if its possible to arrange a blood test or can I ask a nurse? To be honest i get nervous everytime I ring the clinic because they are very busy and quite brusque (and this is private care) and I have learnt far more from this website eg drinking water to avoid OHSS etc.

Thanks

Anne
 

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dear Anne,

The chromosomal analysis will check for any potential problems in the chromosomes which may affect fertility. It is a test worth discussing with your clinic.

Do not be afraid of your clinic and if you do not get on with them then change!! There is so much choice nowadays you must find a clinic who are sympathetic and caring, there are plenty around. This is especailly worrying if you are a private patient, you are really not getting your monies' worth!! I would suggest that you make an appointment to see a consultant and to take along all of your questions and worries and make him/her listen and respond. If they do not want to do this for you then I would change clinics immediately.

Sorry if I am being a bit brusque here it's just that clinics should care for their patients and listen to them at all times. Those who don't do not deserve to have any patients!!

Regards,

Peter

anne1 said:
Hi Peter

Many thanks. Please may I ask what a chromosonal analysis is and what does it look for - my partner has two children from a previous relationship, so would any problems with chromosones have already shown up or can they develop with age?

Also, should I ask the consultant if its possible to arrange a blood test or can I ask a nurse? To be honest i get nervous everytime I ring the clinic because they are very busy and quite brusque (and this is private care) and I have learnt far more from this website eg drinking water to avoid OHSS etc.

Thanks

Anne
 
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