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In February DH and I had bloods done for HIV, Hep B & C. They all came back clear.
We went to clinic on Thursday to go through everything for our 1st IVF - everything was fine BUT on friday - I got a call on my mobile from the clinic (I was shopping in Birmingham at the time) to say that the bloods had been routinely retested - the same blood that I had taken in Feb - and that they were now showing a +ve for Hep C antibodies. This could be a false +ve as the test can be unreliable, it could mean that I've come into contact with Hep C at sometime and my body has destroyed it and I'm -ve or I could have Hep C.

I've got to go for bloods on Tuesday - so they can do another test (PCR) which will give us a guaranteed result. When I met DH everything was fine - since then I've been diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis, Thyroid problems, Infertility and now, possibly this life threatening disease!!  I am devastated, scared and I'm not sure whether I can take anymore slaps in the face.

I've only had unprotected sex twice in my life - when I was young and stupid - but the nurse and Hep C foundation have said that Hep C isn't classed as an STD as it's very very rare for it to be sexually transmitted and that if I have got it then I've got it through blood transfusion, dirty needles etc. I've never had a blood transfusion, never used needles for anything other than Fertility drugs or blood tests. I'm in pieces - and now I have to wait for these bloods to come back which could take ages. DH is -ve.
Why would they retest 3 month old blood? If it was -ve in Feb, how can it be +ve now?

Love from - an in a mess and very scared Sarah xxx
 
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Hi Sarah

I did not want to read and run...I am no expert in this field but do feel for you with all the worry you are undoubtedly going through. You have obviously called your clinic but have you spoken to a haematologist about this? - your GP should be able to help by putting a call through to someone today (if they are nice ;))....I would ask them to investigate whether this is possible etc. Either way - you will have your results back soon from the retest and I hope and pray all will be OK. If you can - why not have them done privately - you will probably get them back the same day and them you need not worry for an age.....I know it is more money but sometimes peace of mind is way more important ^hugme^

Good luck

xxx
 

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By far the most likley explanation is that it's a false +ve

http://www.metrokc.gov/health/prevcont/hepcfactsheet.htm#dx

"Hepatitis C infection is usually diagnosed in two steps using blood tests. The first step is a screening test called ELISA (Enzyme Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay), which tests for an antibody against hepatitis C. (ELISA is often shortened to "EIA".) Antibodies are the cells that your body makes when something enters your body that it does not recognize. Antibodies can tell you that the virus has been in the blood, but they do not tell you if the virus is still there...
Sometimes the ELISA can be false positive. False positive means the test is positive but the person does not have hepatitis C. It is important to do a second test that will confirm the results of a positive ELISA test.

There are two tests that are used to confirm hepatitis C. One is called RIBA (Recombinant ImmunoBlot Assay) and it is a more accurate antibody test than the ELISA. The other test is called a nucleic acid test (NAT). This test can find hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA) in the blood. If the virus is found, the person definitely has hepatitis C."

Also see: http://www.cdc.gov/NCIDOD/DISEASES/HEPATITIS/c/faq.htm#3a

"Can you have a "false positive" anti-HCV test result?
Yes. A false positive test means the test looks as if it is positive, but it is really negative. This happens more often in persons who have a low risk for the disease for which they are being tested. For example, false positive anti-HCV tests happen more often in persons such as blood donors who are at low risk for hepatitis C. "

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/rr/rr5203.pdf

xx

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